Mexico US Immigration Laws

William Shakespeare

Emmigration

Mexico: US Immigration Laws
Interesting Timeline and facts about the Mexico US Immigration Laws are detailed below. These US Immigration Laws relate specifically to Mexican migrants.

Push and Pull Factors of Mexican Immigration to America for kids
For specific examples and a list of political, economic, environmental and social reasons and push and pull factors of Mexican immigration to America refer to Push and Pull Factors of Mexican Immigration.

Mexico: US Immigration Laws

1848: Mexico: US Immigration Laws Fact 1: Articles VIII and IX of the Treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgothat followed the Mexican American War (1846 1848) granted U.S. citizenship to Mexicans living in the territory ceded by Mexico to the United States. The treaty explicitly guaranteed Mexican Americans "the right to their property, language, and culture."

1890: Mexico: US Immigration Laws Fact 2: The individual states of America turned over the control of immigration to the Federal Government.

1891: Mexico: US Immigration Laws Fact 3: The 1891 Immigration Act established the Office of the Superintendent of Immigration within the Treasury Department and imposed stringent standards of admissibility. The law allowed the Secretary of the Treasury to lay down rules for inspection along the borders of Canada, British Columbia, and Mexico so as not to obstruct or unnecessarily delay, impede, or annoy passengers traveling between these countries and the United States.

1892: Mexico: US Immigration Laws Fact 4: The Act of 1891 increased government regulation of immigration and established a
Commissioner of Immigration in the Treasury Department responsible carrying out carrying out the inspection and deportation of immigrants

1906: Mexico: US Immigration Laws Fact 5: The Naturalization Act of 1906 established the Bureau of Immigration and Naturalization in the Commerce Department to standardize naturalization procedures. The law also required that some knowledge of the English language was a requirement for citizenship.

1915: Mexico: US Immigration Laws Fact 6: The Mexican Revolution (1910 - 1920) began and many Mexicans sought escape to the United States. In 1915 US Congress Authorized "Mounted Inspectors" along the US-Mexico Border

1921: Mexico: US Immigration Laws Fact 7: The Emergency Quota Act used of percentage system to restrict the number of immigrants from a given country (3% of the number of residents from that same country living in the United States based on the 1910 U.S. Census)

1924: Mexico: US Immigration Laws Fact 8: The Border Patrol was established to combat illegal immigration and smuggling. Border stations were established to formally admit Mexican workers

1924: Mexico: US Immigration Laws Fact 9: The Immigration Act of 1924 restricted the number of immigrants from a given country to 2% of the number of residents from that same country living in the United States. 87% of permits went to immigrants from Britain, Ireland, Germany, and Scandinavia

1943: Mexico: US Immigration Laws Fact 10: The Bracero Program brought 5 million temporary Mexican Laborers to work on US farms and railroads to help the economy during and after WW2

1986: Mexico: US Immigration Laws Fact 11: The Immigration Reform and Control Act (IRCA) granted legal status to qualifying immigrants who entered the US illegally before January 1, 1982

1990: Mexico: US Immigration Laws Fact 12: The Immigration Act of 1990 revised all grounds for deportation and increased the limits on legal immigration to the United States

2006: Mexico: US Immigration Laws Fact 13: The Secure Fence Act authorized fencing along the US-Mexican Border and authorized the use of surveillance technology

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